Emerson on the books we read

“I cannot remember the books I read any more than the meals I have eaten, even so, they have made me.”


A New Edition of David Loy’s Non-Duality, A Classic

Book1-200x300

 

Loy’s book is essential for anyone practicing some level of Zen, Buddhism, Taoism, or a student of the writings of Heidegger or the Japanese philosophers related to the writings of Suzuki, Abe, et al. Loy was a student in Yamada Roshi’s Sanbo Kyodan lineage. The new edition has a revised introduction and notes; it is published by Yale University Press.


Richard Poirier and Stanley Cavell: two inspired guides into deepest Emerson

“Emerson says now and then that language might lead us back to human origins, that ‘language,’ as he says in ‘The Poet,’ is ‘fossil poetry.’ This implies that there are discoverable traces in language of that aboriginal power by which we invent ourselves as a unique form of nature. Frost in an Emersonian mood ends the poem ‘All Revelation’ with a tribute to this human inventiveness:

‘Eyes seeking the response of eyes

Bring out the stars, bring out the flowers,

Thus concentrating earth and skies

So none need be afraid of size.

All revelation has been ours. ‘”


D.T. Suzuki jottings

This is part of several fragments and notes jotted down on the back of an envelope by D.T. Suzuki and published in The Eastern Buddhist in Vol XXXIII No. 2 in 2001. They were immediate flashes of his inner experience and understanding as contrasted with the careful prose found in his essays and books.


A red heliconia flower


My next door neighbor


Morning light in Chiang Mai